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CCE Advisory Council External Members

Angelika Amon, PhD, is the Kathleen and Curtis Marble Professor of Cancer Research at the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as well as an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. She is interested in characterizing the regulatory networks that control cell division and in examining the consequences of errors in this process on normal cellular physiology and on tumorigenesis. Her lab works on understanding how cell growth and division are regulated during normal development and in disease states. They also study the effects on cells that undergo a faulty cell division, when defying the cell cycle quality control mechanisms,  and hence become aneuploid.

 

Myles Brown, MD, is a Professor of Medicine at DFCI and HMS as well as a practicing physician in oncology at the Brigham And Women's Hospital. Dr. Brown's research laboratory focuses on elucidating the epigenetic factors underlying the action of steroid hormones. This work has important implications both for normal physiology and for the treatment of hormone dependent malignancies including breast and prostate cancer. He is recognized for three seminal discoveries. His lab opened the steroid receptor coregulator field, illuminated the dynamic nature of receptor and coregulator interaction with the genome and elucidated the importance of epigenetically determined distant cis-regulatory steroid receptor binding sites. His contributions have uniquely reformulated the understanding of steroid hormone action in normal physiology and in hormone-dependent cancer.

 

Michael Yaffe, MD, PhD, is the David H. Koch Professor of Biology and Biological Engineering at MIT and Attending Surgeon at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School. The Yaffe Lab is interested in understanding how signaling pathways are integrated at the molecular and sytems level to control cellular responses. Their interest has particularly focused on signaling pathways and networks that control cell cycle progression and DNA damage responses in cancer and cancer therapy, as well as the cross-talk between inflammation, cytokine signaling and cancer. Additionally, their work is directed to understanding how modular protein domains and kinases work together to build molecular signaling circuits. The research is multi-disciplinary and encompasses biochemistry, biophysics, strutural and cell biology, engineering, and computation/bioinformatics.